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Constitutional Convention By Hon. Jerry Kremer

Every 20 years New York voters are asked to decide whether there should be a constitutional convention. The last time voters had a choice of whether to hold a new convention was in 1997 and the idea was rejected by a large margin. By law, if a convention is approved, there would be another vote in 2018 to elect delegates, who would serve in 2019. It is important that a vote for a new convention be defeated and there are plenty of reasons why…The last convention was in 1967. There were many ideas discussed but the majority were the same topics that the state legislature had been considering for many years. From personal experience, I was a visitor to the 1967 event and many of the delegates were elected officials who were anxious to get two public salaries in one year and it padded their pensions with little to show for it. There are many outside elite groups who are anxious for there to be a new convention. Some would like to abolish the State Senate and have a one-house legislature. Losing the influence of the Senate and its Majority Leader John Flanagan (R-Huntington) would be a serious blow to Long Island. It would be good for New York City, but the suburbs have its own needs and we have to fight to protect them. We have some of the best public schools in our two counties who do a great job educating our children. Regrettably, there are a number of groups who are anxious to shift money away from public schools and spend it on charter schools only. Our current constitution protects our state parks from overdevelopment. There are quite a few developers who are anxious to have the protections that are in the current constitution removed so that they can develop golf courses and luxury housing on precious parkland. All of the important environmental groups have announced their opposition to holding a convention. It is no secret today that the amount of money being spent in campaigns around the nation is mind-boggling. Unknown front groups get involved in local election issues and their dollars can influence the outcome of any election. Next year we will have statewide and Congressional elections, which will attract a lot of attention. While voters are concentrating on major contests, slates of convention delegates could be elected who have no stake in the future of Long Island and here is a simple statistic. In the past 100 years over 200 amendments have been adopted that were approved by the state legislature, without the need for a convention. As an example, this November voters will decide whether to take away the pensions of public officials who commit crimes related to their official position. The system does work and there is no need to spend $100 million on more on an event that is a carbon copy of what the current legislature does. This year more than ever your vote will make a big difference in the future of Long Island and our state.

The smart vote is a “No” vote on a Constitutional Convention.

Former Assemblyman Arthur “Jerry” Kremer is a well-known political figure on Long Island. He served in the State Assembly for 13 terms and headed the powerful Ways and Means Committee. He was the sponsor of many consumer laws including the Automobile Lemon Law. He is seen frequently on News 12 where he provides political commentary. He is a Trustee of Hofstra University and is involved with many local charities. He is a partner at the law firm of Ruskin Moscou Faltischek in Uniondale and is President of Empire Government Strategies.